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   avant-garde movies, motion graphics, and theory

An Immaterial Medium

story © Michael Betancourt | published November 30, 2015 | permalink | TwitThis Digg Facebook StumbleUpon  |  Print



Glitch & Postdigital

The particular dimensions of a physical engagement with immateriality in motion pictues depends on the fragmentary nature of the digital medium itself: everything inside the computer exists as numerically encoded data: the fragmentation and digital organization of information that when replayed for a human audience appears continuous via discrete units (commonly called samples) is a given when considering any product of digital technology. These discrete fragments of reality enable the transmission, reproduction, and reassembly that are the common features of any digital technology, and the apparently prefect reproduction originated precisely in the actuality that what is encountered through the immaterial production of the digital work is not a copy so much as a new example produced specifically for the moment of encounter; it is an original. This reassembly from fragmentary samples may not have been an invention of the late nineteenth century, but it was in this period where sampling, coupled with new developments in photography, introduced the essential foundation for the digital transformation of reality into data that enables the digital to function as a perfect reproduction.




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Previews of My Glitches

story © Michael Betancourt | published November 26, 2015 | permalink | TwitThis Digg Facebook StumbleUpon  |  Print



Glitch & Postdigital

I have an Instagram account with stills from my movies and movie-tests.






 

Anti-Formalist Glitches

story © Michael Betancourt | published November 26, 2015 | permalink | TwitThis Digg Facebook StumbleUpon  |  Print



Glitch & Postdigital

​A potential revealation of the materiality of the digital is thus only one part of what the digital glitch might present: the other part is the utter dependence of all these technologies on the human social realm. The particular form of a digital work when rendered for human viewing/encounter makes the purpose of that particular data stream apparent, whether it is a movie, a piece of music, a text or anything else, the data itself is encoded for human purposes. The automatic nature of the digital device is of a different character than the autonomy of agency. The illusion that our devices function without our input, without responding to our desires and demands is a reflection of their design, and the functions these machines are constructed to achievethe superficially mysterious, perfect nature of the digitally manufactured, its magical aura, work to obscure the underlying physical reality of the digital and its subservience to human choices and agency. These foundations are all hidden within the aura of the digital, most especially the dependent relationship between the functioning of the digital technology and the demands made by the desires of human society (and provides its formal basis).




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Notes on Glitch

story © Michael Betancourt | published June 11, 2015 | permalink | TwitThis Digg Facebook StumbleUpon  |  Print



Glitch & Postdigital

Here is a scan of some notes on Glitch [pdf] from 2009 that might be of interest.






 

Critical Glitches and Glitch Art

story © Michael Betancourt | published July 16, 2014 | permalink | TwitThis Digg Facebook StumbleUpon  |  Print



Glitch & Postdigital

My article discussing the political economy of glitch art came out on Hz Journal today. It's a discussion of how we identify a glitch as being critical, and what this means for media art makers.





 

About Making Dancing Glitch

story © Michael Betancourt | published September 11, 2013 | permalink | TwitThis Digg Facebook StumbleUpon  |  Print



Glitch & Postdigital

OtherZine 25 has my article on making Dancing Glitch where I discuss how recognizing glitches depends on the audience, not what was done to/in making the work.






 

Glitches in Art

story © Michael Betancourt | published January 20, 2013 | permalink | TwitThis Digg Facebook StumbleUpon  |  Print



Glitch & Postdigital

This is an excerpt from a new article (slated for publication in Hz no 19) on the use of glitches in art, and how that use related to a critically engaged media practice:

The term glitch art is an attempt to distinguish between the specific use of glitches in an artwork as opposed to those happening spontaneously in non-art contexts/works: it is also a term that describes a particular media practice identified as being critically engaged. However, the distinction between an unpremeditated technical failure, unstable and transitory, and the use of audio-or-visual artifacts that coincide with these incidental errors, stable and repeatably a part of a finished work may be difficult to identify when encountered in a work since they can (and in artistic practice often are) indistinguishable; the ontological origins of any particular glitch are not necessary apparent in the form of the glitch itself. Various writers on glitch art have proposed terms to identify this ontological distinction between a transitory technical failure (always called glitch) and other variants that are then given a different designation, but which may have the same formglitch-alike (Morandi), domesticated glitch (Menkman). These distinctions are problematic in art, as theorist Curt Cloninger has observed: The term glitch art might apply to all domesticated glitches and all wild glitches that have been captured and recontextualized as art. The might opens the potential scope of glitch art beyond simply those glitches captured in a recording to include wild glitches orchestrated to occur on demand within a specific performace. Digital technology itself, based in sampling, enables the apparently perfect reproduction that is the hypothetical norm which allows the identification of the glitch. What is produced by the immaterial processing of digital technology is an always perfect new example of the work in question, made specifically for the moment of encounter; it is an original. This human-readable form is a pure product of the digitized samples (data) transformed by the decoding protocol. Glitch art is a reflection of how artists have engaged with this underlying structure by looking for, producing or exploiting the errors emergent in any complex system.




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Formal Films?

story © Michael Betancourt | published July 2, 2004 | permalink | TwitThis Digg Facebook StumbleUpon  |  Print



Glitch & Postdigital

It's possible to think of the appearance of flicker films, leader-based films and other materially-linked films produced in the 1960s and 1970s not as a formalist reduction, but as a reaction to the emergence of video as an alternative to film.




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Video Accelleration by Dropping Frames

story © Michael Betancourt | published June 2, 2004 | permalink | TwitThis Digg Facebook StumbleUpon  |  Print



Glitch & Postdigital

Kallahar explains how he took a 10 hour video of driving and accellerated it to be a 6 minute video.

With sample clips.






 

IMHO 15: Welcome to Cyberia

story © Michael Betancourt | published September 19, 2003 | permalink | TwitThis Digg Facebook StumbleUpon  |  Print



Glitch & Postdigital

repost from The Miami Art Exchange [pdf]

There is a set of engineering issues that are common to all technological arts in the digital age: sampling,fragmentation and reassembly, data compression and expansion... and the glitch. We like the glitch, not because it formalistically reminds us what we are seeing is an artifact (it does), but because in our encounter and by developing our relationship to the glitch, we can enter into a dialogue with our technology on its own terms, negotiating for points of contact between what we-as-audience will accept and what we reject as technological failure, as an interruption to our fantasies of dominance, power,mastery.




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