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   movies: AESTHETICS
   movies: NEWS & REVIEWS
   movies: SHOWS & SCREENINGS
   random art notes
   random how-tos
   research: AVANT-GARDE MOVIES
   research: MOTION GRAPHICS
   research: VISUAL MUSIC
   theory: CRITICAL OBSERVATIONS
   theory: DIGITAL CAPITALISM
   theory: GLITCH & POSTDIGITAL
   theory: working notes

 

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SEARCH ARCHIVES

archives begin in 1996

  

1935 Review of Oskar Fischinger

story © Michael Betancourt | published November 14, 2013 | permalink | TwitThis Digg Facebook StumbleUpon  |  Print



research: VISUAL MUSIC

The Last of the Mohicans: Oskar Fischingers Symphony in Blue

Rough translation of review originally published by FilmLiga, 15 November 1935, pp. 314-315

(314)​That the avant-garde as movement is dead no one will dare to doubt. They broke with confidence that a good-death are venturing with all sides the staff about her, and more or less officially has her first partisans agree with the grave of the filmmaker the deceased commemorated in FilmLiga. For us, that the avant-garde movement very dear have stood, falling from the contradiction of the judgments to ascertaining down two basic facts: first, that the movement within the limits of its experimental nature so useful and invaluable services has proven to aesthetics of the film that we miss only considering her labor at the stage of sound film. Second: that its continued existence, independently, was impossible purely due to reasons of the sound film at least, so it seemed. . . .




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Stan Brakhage's Film Theory & Visual Music

story © Michael Betancourt | published September 4, 2011 | permalink | TwitThis Digg Facebook StumbleUpon  |  Print



research: VISUAL MUSIC

An Excerpt from The History of Motion Graphics:


Stan Brakhage (1933 2003) is exceptional, both in the sheer quantity of films he made, and in the innovative aesthetics and novel techniques he created that characterize the wide variety of his films. His work with abstract film that dominated his productions starting in the 1980s clearly demonstrates the close connections, continuously present in his film theories, between his films and visual music. Actively producing film work from the 1950s until his death in 2003, the last decade of his life was spent primarily working on abstract films whose finished form was created through a combination of direct hand painting processes and optical printing. These works reveal a direct linkage between the earliest abstract films and contemporary media art (such as VJ and the visual music renaissance brought about by digital technology).




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CVM's "Research"

story © Michael Betancourt | published August 19, 2011 | permalink | TwitThis Digg Facebook StumbleUpon  |  Print



research: VISUAL MUSIC

This is a response to some misinformation being spread about my work on this site by the "Center for Visual Music."

This could be read as an example of how not to do history if you're supposedly an archive or other historical organization. Read on, and see the absurdity....




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Visual Music and the Paik-Abe Videosynthesizer

story © Michael Betancourt | published July 24, 2011 | permalink | TwitThis Digg Facebook StumbleUpon  |  Print



research: VISUAL MUSIC

An Excerpt from The History of Motion Graphics:


The Paik-Abe videosynthesizer was a powerful video processing device. It enabled an experimental transformation of video, and was designed to create complex, visually dynamic imagery, but had only a limited ability to reproduce that imagery at a later time. Constructed by Nam June Paik and engineer Shuya Abe, the ability to recreate its imagery was systematically developed by another video artist, Ron Hays, who explored and documented what was required to create a specific range of visual forms on screen in order to produce a lexicon of forms to use the videosynthesizer as an electronic visual music instrument.




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Oskar Fischinger's Synchronized Abstractions

story © Michael Betancourt | published June 19, 2011 | permalink | TwitThis Digg Facebook StumbleUpon  |  Print



research: VISUAL MUSIC

An Excerpt from The History of Motion Graphics:


Oskar Fischinger (1900 1967) is the artist most closely associated with the production of abstract animations using a direct synchronization of note to form.




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